Russell McOrmond's blog

Vancouver Community College phases in more Linux

An ITBusines.ca article by Sarah Lysecki includes:

A B.C. post-secondary institution said it intends to grow the number of Linux machines in its data centre as it replaces older hardware infrastructure with blade servers.

Vancouver Community College made the switch to Linux from a mixed environment of NetWare and Windows operating systems one year ago when it purchased IBM blade servers, which came with Linux pre-installed, to replace its aging infrastructure.
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Because the new system uses browser versus Windows-based forms, Dougan said it will help to make it easier to move towards a Linux desktop environment.

Feds put open source into active service

An ITBusiness.ca article by Shane Schick includes:

The Canadian government is planning to use GForge as the starting point for asset management. A Treasury Board director walks us through the process and identifies the applications that will be tackled first.


If you live in Ottawa and want to find out more about this project, you may want to attend a GOSLING Gaggle.

Letter to ITBusiness.ca Re: proposed changes to government procurement policy

The following letter was sent in reply to CATA appoints government relations exec to take on procurement.

CATA is dealing with problems that are similar to those experienced by Free/Libre and Open Source Software (FLOSS) companies. The government wants to skip intermediaries when procuring products that originate from a single source, but seem to forget the value added by these intermediaries. What ends up happening is that if the single source is a vendor that also offers related services that the government is effectively bypassing procurement policy intended to protect competition.

More CopyCamp information

The CopyCamp website has been updated with answers to many questions, providing more information for those thinking of attending this event in Toronto from September 28 to the 30'th. This event will bring together people from the arts community, the Free/Libre and Open Source Software community, and others interested in creativity and copyright together in one conference. The full list of questions includes:


  • What is CopyCamp?
  • What is an unconference? What is a camp? Is this one?
  • Who is running CopyCamp?
  • Is it free? Is it expensive?

Intel aims for open-source graphics advantage

An article by Stephen Shankland, Staff Writer, CNET News.com includes:

Intel has released open-source software to give Linux full-fledged support for 3D graphics, a move that could give its graphics chips a leg up over rivals.

OSDL Signs Up Xandros to Accelerate Adoption of Desktop Linux

An August 09, 2006 ODSL and Xandros press release includes:

Open Source Development Labs (OSDL), a global consortium dedicated to accelerating the adoption of Linux® and open source software, and Xandros, the leading provider of easy-to-use Linux alternatives to Windows desktop and server products, today announced that Xandros is joining the Labs to help drive the adoption of desktop Linux. Xandros will participate in OSDL's Desktop Linux (DTL) working group with a specific focus on advancing standards-based usability and consistency.

Xandros is has headquarters in New York, offices in Frankfurt and Mumbai, and research and development facilities in Ottawa.

FACIL monthly presentation: downloading, copyright and the recent infamous DADVSI French law

FACIL, is holding an event on Friday the 11th of August 2006, 18h00 at the CRIM (550 Sherbrooke O., suite 100, near metro McGill).

Read the English translation of the announcement. I will be there to help clarify where Canada differs from the French process and law.

FACIL is a non-profit organization that promotes the use of Free Software in Quebec.

Torvalds' comments on GPLv3 committees refuted: Looking for feedback.

A NewsForge article by Bruce Byfield includes:

Torvalds' comments should probably be read in the context of his statement that his particular concerns, notably the mention of DRM, have not been addressed. Yet, in fact, they have been. In an interview with NewsForge, Eben Moglen, who heads the revision process, specifically mentioned that some changes in the second draft were specifically made in response to Torvalds' concerns. Apparently, the changes were not enough to satisfy Torvalds, who has ideological differences with the FSF, but that is no reason to condemn the process itself as hypocritical.

Whose hardware is it anyway?

With the recent launch of the Petition to protect Information Technology property rights at the Ottawa Linux Symposium (French translation in progress), we now move to the harder stage of explaining the petition not only to those who we want to sign it, but those whose activities we wish to influence. It is not only politicians who must help protect our property rights, but also software authors who we want to discourage from working with monopolies in the hardware manufacturing and content industries to circumvent our property rights.

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